7 things teens should know about car insurance

Teens and car insurance

Teens and car insurance

As a teenager, car insurance might not be your favorite thing to think about. It’s not fun, admittedly, and it’s not “cool”. But it is a necessary thing, and it’s important to know the basics. So, we’ve got a quick list of things teens should know about car insurance. Don’t worry – we’ll keep it light and not-boring.

7 things teens should know about car insurance.

1. Driving safe is essential.

Okay, so the thing is that being young means that car insurance rates are kind of against you. Young drivers don’t have a lot of experience behind the wheel. It’s important to drive safe so as to avoid tickets, which have a lot of consequences –  the anger of the parental units and being in trouble among them. But they can also mean higher insurance rates. (But of course the primary reason to drive safe is to avoid accidents that could hurt you and others.)

2. Getting good grades can help your rates.

There are a lot of reasons to hit the books and keep your grades up. One of those reasons is that it could help you get lower car insurance rates. That’s because it can help you score a Good Student Discount. And discounts on car insurance (particularly for teens) are a good thing. Now, keep in mind that you’ll probably need to show some sort of proof of your good grades – like a report card – and meet the qualifications set by the insurance carrier. But still – if you make good grades in school, don’t be shy about it. Ask if it can earn you a discount.

3. Drivers’ ed can also help your insurance rates.

Taking a drivers’ ed class that’s approved by your insurance company can also help you when it comes to your car insurance rates. Okay, yes, driver’s ed might not sound like the most thrilling thing out there. But you can learn valuable stuff from a class, and if you think about it, it’s just a temporary thing. It’s not like it’s forever. It’s definitely something to think about and find out about.

Teens and car insurance 2

4. There’s a reason you need to drive a sensible vehicle.

Okay, okay, we get it. Everyone wants to drive the shiny, fancy, expensive car. But if you drive a safe, sensible car, you could (once again) have lower car insurance rates. So, yes, you might desperately want your parents to get you a fancy ride, but in reality your parents might be onto something by having you drive the family SUV or minivan. It’s a sensible plan, really.

5. It’s probably best to be on your parents’ policy.

Rather than being on your own policy for your car insurance, your parents should likely ad you to their car insurance policy. If they have good driving records this will probably help your family’s overall insurance situation. So, it’s yet another consideration when it comes to getting you properly insured. Insurance can be complicated, but it’s something your parents will likely be discussing.

6. Different coverages do different things.

It’s important for teens to understand that different insurance coverages do different things. Here are some of the common ones:

Bodily injury liability: Can help cover the other driver’s medical expenses if you injure them in an accident. Plus it can help cover your legal expenses if you get sued over the accident.

Property damage liability: Can help cover the costs of repairing someone’s property if you damage it in an accident (i.e. the other driver’s car).

Collision coverage: Can help repair your car if you’re in an accident (though you’ll still have to pay your deductible) or if you hit something.

Comprehensive coverage: Can cover damage to your car not caused by an accident, such as vandalism, animal strike, falling objects (i.e. tree branches), and hail. It can also cover theft.

Uninsured/Underinsured motorist: Can help you if you’re hit by a driver who doesn’t have insurance or who doesn’t have enough insurance enough insurance to cover the incident.

7. Georgia has minimum limits of car insurance.

It’s also important to note that the state of Georgia has minimum limits of insurance that drivers have to have. Drivers have to carry at least $25,000 of bodily injury liability per person, $50,000 of bodily injury liability per occurrence, and $25,000 of property damage liability. Anyway – the point is that it’s essential to carry the appropriate insurance. Always make sure that you’ve got plenty of car insurance. It can bail you out of some really sticky situations.

If your family needs some car insurance quotes, our team can help. We like to make insurance easy and help people save money on their insurance. To get int ouch with us, all you have to do is fill out our online form, give us a call, or message us on LiveChat.

How to create a teen driving contract

Teen driving contract

Teen driving contract

Teenagers can be a lot. And if you’ve got a teen driver on your hands, you’re probably very nervous. And that is totally understandable. Teens aren’t exactly known for their ability to make responsible decisions. So, what’s a parent to do when their teenager is about to get their license? You can take the time to create a driving contract with your teenager. Here are a few tips to give you a place to start with your parent-teen driving contract.

What is a teen driving contract?

The parent-teen driver contract is a set of guidelines and rules that the driver has to follow. It also gives consequences if those rules are broken. Basically, it outlines your expectations for the teen driver and it also makes sure that everyone is on the same page with both the rules and what would happen if those rules are not followed. It’s an agreement between the teen driver and the parent.

Tips for your parent-teen driving contract.

1. Convey the seriousness of driving.

The driving agreement is meant to convey that driving is a very serious responsibility. The contract makes sure that your teen knows that driving is a privilege. They need to understand that they need to be very careful behind the wheel. Driving isn’t just a convenience or a new, fun thing. It’s a big deal, one that needs to be taken seriously.

2. Clarify the rules and the consequences.

You also need to be sure your rules and consequences are written clearly. There should be little “wiggle room” or room for interpretation. Everything needs to be laid out properly, including the consequences or punishments that you establish for breaking the rules. Then the trick becomes actually sticking to these agreed-upon punishments. The rules and consequences need to be upheld.

3. Have both parent and teen sign the contract.

It’s important to open a discussion about safe driving and the guidelines. Talk about what rules are safe and fair, and ensure that everyone is on the same page. Go over it together and make sure it’s something that everyone is comfortable signing. (But remember – you are the parent in the situation!) One of the goals of the contract is to get rid of any confusion concerning the driving rules and to get everyone in agreement – with signatures to prove it.

4. Make sure to include the important stuff.

When outlining your contract, make sure to look at Georgia’s laws. These can be the basis of your contract, but of course, as a parent, you may want to add your own rules that make sense for your teen and your situation. Here are some areas to look at and establish rules for:

  • Curfew (Remember Georgia law)
  • Where the teen is allowed to drive
  • Establish rules about cellphone use, music use, etc. (Again, remember to look at GA’s laws, including the Hands-free law)
  • Seatbelt use
  • What happens if the teen gets a ticket (i.e. speeding) or fine
  • What happens if the teen drinks and drives
  • The number of passengers they can drive (again, be aware of Georgia’s laws and the graduated licensing system)
  • What happens if any part of the contract is broken

It’s important to cover all the bases when you create your teen-parent driver contract. There are a lot of areas about driving that your teen needs to be aware of. The goal isn’t to scare your teen or make them feel overwhelmed with rules, but to encourage them to make good decisions and drive safely.

5. Remember that the rules can change.

Remember that you can adjust and relax some of the rules that you set as time passes. (Not the laws, of course, but the other rules.) As your teenager gets more practice in and grows up a bit, you can loosen your rules. You can evaluate as you go – maybe you can give your teen some more freedom, contingent on their good behavior. Remember to readjust the contract and consequences accordingly. You can let your teen know that they will be trusted with more when that trust is earned.

You also need to make sure that your teen is properly insured. You might be a bit afraid of the insurance rates. (You’ve heard the rumors of teen car insurance being extremely expensive.) We would be happy to help you get teen car insurance to protect your young driver. Get started with your car insurance quote by filling out our online form, giving us a call, or messaging us on LiveChat. Our team likes to make insurance easy.

What you need to know about Georgia’s graduated license program

The Georgia graduated license program places restrictions on young drivers.

If you have a teenager who’s about to get their Georgia learner’s permit or driver’s license, there are a few things you need to know about the Georgia graduated license program. See, when your teen gets their license, they can’t just go driving around all hours of the night with as many passengers as they want. Their license has restrictions until they turn 18. As time goes by, those restrictions are loosened until the driver turns 18 and all limitations are lifted. We’ll explain how the Georgia graduated license program works.

Georgia’s Graduated License Program: TADRA

Before we break down each “step” in the Georgia licensing process, let’s talk a little about the program itself.

TADRA, or the Teenage and Adult Driver Responsibility Act, is the system that allows drivers aged 15-18 to “graduate” to less restrictive licensing as they gain driving experience. TADRA places limitations on when newly licensed drivers are allowed to drive and how many passengers they can have in the car. It was passed in an effort to prevent accidents and fatalities among young, teenaged drivers. The restrictions placed on these newly licensed drivers are meant to increase their safety and lower their likelihood of being in a crash.

(Note: TADRA is also known as Joshua’s Law.)

The Three Steps of Georgia’s Graduated License Program:

Phase One: The learner’s permit.

The first step is to get a learner’s permit (a.k.a. instructional permit.) In Georgia, a teenager can get a permit when they’re 15 if they successfully pass the written exam. As they’re learning to drive, the teenager must be accompanied by a driver who has a valid Class C license and who is over 21 years of age.

The first step of the Georgia graduated license system is getting a learner's permit.

Phase Two: The Intermediate License (Class D)

Teenagers aged 16-18 are eligible for a Class D license if they’ve had their learner’s permit for 12 months and passed their driving test. If the teenager is 16, they cannot get their license unless they’ve completed an approved driver’s ed class. Seventeen-year-olds do not need a driver’s ed class.

(However, any driver aged 16 or 17 must have completed 40 hours of supervised driving experience, and six of those hours must be at night.)

There are restrictions for drivers who have a Class D license:

  • They cannot drive between 12 a.m. and 5 a.m.
  • They can only have a certain number of passengers in the car.
    • For the first six months after getting their license, no passenger that is not an immediate family member can be in the car.
    • For the second six months, only one passenger (who is not immediate family) that is under age 21 can be in the vehicle.
    • After one year, no more than three other passengers (under age 21) who are not immediate family members can be in the vehicle.
  • They have to meet Joshua’s Law requirements.
    • Any sixteen-year-old who gets a Class D license must have completed a driver’s ed class approved by the Dept. of Driver’s Services.
    • They also must have completed 40 hours of other supervised driving with at least six hours of night driving.

Phase Three: The full license (Class C)

When a teenager reaches age 18, they can graduate to a Class C license and the driving restrictions are lifted. Their Class D license must be valid and they cannot have been convicted of any major traffic violations to get a Class C license.

Also, keep in mind that Georgia does not tolerate underage drinking and driving. Any underage (under 21) driver with a blood-alcohol level of .08 grams or more will have their license suspended for 12 months on the first offense.

Teen driver safety.

As a parent, it’s important that you explain these restrictions to your teen and make sure they know to respect them. As we said, the restrictions are to keep the teenager safer and reduce traffic accidents among newly licensed drivers.

The reasoning behind the restrictions is sound. Night driving is a different story than driving during the day. Bright headlights make it tricky to see and react to hazards in time – teens just don’t have a lot of experience with night driving. As for passengers, they’re distracting. They can cause a teenager to lose focus on driving.

Along with ensuring that your teenager follows the restrictions of their license, you as a parent can do the following to keep your teen driver safe.

  • Talk to them about the dangers of texting and driving.
  • Have them practice a lot.
  • Set a good example.
  • Set some rules for driving and using the car.
  • Get them a safe vehicle.
  • Encourage seatbelt use.
  • Make sure they don’t drive tired.

Georgia’s graduated license program (TADRA) is intended to keep newly licensed drivers safe by placing limitations on when they’re allowed to drive and how many passengers they can have in the car. Be sure to talk to your teenager about the restrictions and understand why it’s so important to follow them.

And, of course, it’s important to get great Atlanta teen auto insurance. Our agents can help you shop for quality coverage at a great rate. Yes, teen auto insurance can be expensive, but we can help you save money while getting your new driver the coverage they need. Get started with car insurance quotes by filling out our online form or giving us a call today.

Source:

https://dds.georgia.gov/teen-drivers

What’s the Good Student Discount and how can it help me save on Atlanta teen auto insurance?

The Good Student Discount can help lower teen car insurance rates.

The Good Student Discount can help lower teen car insurance rates.

Discounts are great. Who doesn’t like to pay less money for something just because the powers that be decided it should be so? Whether it’s getting 25% off a new pair of jeans or 15% off a jar of peanut butter, saving money gives you that satisfied, fuzzy feeling. And you know what? That’s especially true for insurance. There’s a super cool discount for young drivers that can help them (or you as their parent/payer of bills) save money on Atlanta teen auto insurance. It’s called the Good Student Discount, and it’s offered by many different insurance carriers. It might sound too good to be true, but it’s a real thing! We’ll explain what you need to know about the Good Student Discount.

What’s the Good Student Discount?

So, here’s the thing about teen auto insurance rates:

It’s often really expensive to insure a teen driver or a young adult (early 20s.) There are a few reasons for this. Teenagers don’t exactly have a ton of experience driving. And teenagers tend to be just a little reckless (not all teenagers, of course, but enough of them.) They might not make the best decisions when it comes to driving and they’re not terribly experienced drivers, and as a result, their age group is involved in a lot of accidents. Age is one of those factors that influence car insurance rates.

But the thing about the Good Student Discount is that it rewards teens and young drivers who have gotten good grades by lowering their Georgia car insurance rates. “Good students” are seen as being less of a risk to insure because they’ve shown that they’re responsible and capable of making good choices. To an insurance company, an A or B student is more likely to be a safe, responsible driver who won’t engage in risky behavior than a student with lower grades. And a safe teen driver is less likely to have an accident and file a claim.

Basically, the Good Student Discount can help offset those high teen car insurance rates if you’re the proud parent of a smart cookie.

Does my teen or college student qualify for the discount?

The requirements to be eligible for the Good Student Discount depend on the carrier, but the following gives you a general idea of the possible requirements.

The student must:

  • Be under the age of 25.
  • Be enrolled as a full-time high school, college, or university student. (However, some carriers extend the discount even after college graduation.)
  • Have a 3.0 GPA or higher.
  • Have a score in the top 20% on the SAT, ACT, or PSAT.
  • Be an honor roll or Dean’s List student.

How do I get the Good Student Discount?

You’ll have to talk to your agent. They’re probably going to ask to see some proof of how amazing your kid is, so get ready to brag on your student! You may have to present one of the following as evidence of your teenager’s Good-Student-status:

  • A transcript or report card.
  • Test scores from a standardized exam.
  • A letter from the school administration.
  • A certificate for honor roll or Dean’s List.

You may also have to provide proof that your student is enrolled in the high school or university that they attend. If your student is home-schooled, you can provide a certification from a homeschool certifying agency, such as the state’s Department of Education.

One more thing:

You may have to continue to show that your student is still succeeding in school. Your agent might be in touch from time to time to ask for the latest report card or transcript so that they know your teen is still in good standing.

What are the savings from the Good Student Discount?

The specific discount amount or savings depends on your carrier – for example, it could be 15%. If your student makes good grades and they’re doing well in school, it’s definitely not a bad idea to investigate further and see if your carrier can help you save some money with this discount. Every little bit counts.

Are you looking for Atlanta car insurance quotes or trying to find out the best way to insure your student? We can help. We can help you get great coverage at a great rate. We enjoy making insurance as stress-free as possible and helping drivers save money on car insurance. All you have to do to get started with your car insurance quotes is fill out our online quote form or give us a call today.

Source:

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/g/good-student-discount.asp

What you need to know about keeping your Atlanta teen driver safe

It's important to talk about good driving habits with your teen driver.

It's important to talk about good driving habits with your teen driver.

If you’re the parent of a teenager who’s about to get their driver’s license, you’re probably a little panicked at the thought of your kid getting behind the wheel of a car. That’s perfectly normal. Letting your child roll out the door with the car keys in hand might send a pang through the heart.

But we’ve got good news: there are things you can do as a parent to help keep your teen driver safe on the road. Check out the following list.

1. Talk about texting and driving.

You need to make it very clear to your teenager why it’s dangerous to text and drive or talk on the phone and drive. Every parent wants to think that their kid will resist the temptation to use their phone while driving, but it’s important to let your child know that your expectation, not to mention the law, is no phone while driving.

2. Send your teen to driver’s ed.

Taking a driver’s ed class helps gives your teen driver more practice behind the wheel. It will also help reinforce the skills they need to be a responsible, safe driver. Plus, you might get a discount that will help you save money on teen auto insurance if you send your kid to driver’s ed.

3. Have your teen get lots of practice.

Practice makes perfect. It’s a good idea to have your teen driver get plenty of road time before testing for their license. Have them get their permit as soon as possible. It’s also a good idea to have them practice in different driving conditions, such as traffic and rain (of course, it’s important that your child feels comfortable and confident enough behind the wheel before you introduce new variables like rain.) Driving is scary enough without having to worry about how to drive safely in the rain.

4. Set some rules.

Most states have laws for newly licensed drivers. Georgia law has a curfew for teen drivers. It also limits the number of passengers you can have in the car at once. There’s a graduated license system that you and your teen need to understand.

Those are only a few of the limitations placed on new drivers. Familiarize yourself with Georgia laws and make sure your teen understands and knows them, too. Be sure to enforce these laws – they were created for a reason. You may even want to create some rules of your own.

Pro tip: Come up with a parent-teen contract of safe driving rules that you want your teen to follow. Distracted driving, curfew, seatbelt use, passengers, and “radius” might be some things you lay out in your contract. Then have your teen driver sign it. Studies have shown that a formal agreement reduces risky behavior.

Writing a contract can help keep your teen driver safe.

5. Set a good example.

If you’re being a safe driver, your teen will see your good habits and hopefully emulate them. If they see you fiddling with your phone, not wearing a seatbelt, speeding, eating, or losing your temper, how can you expect them not to do the same? Kids (including teen drivers) absorb everything. So, teach your teen how to be a safe driver by showing them.

6. Present them with the keys to the “family car.”

Rather than getting your teen driver a new car or even a new-used car, let them drive the family car. This might encourage them to be more responsible and make good decisions.

7. Make sure the car they’re driving is safe.

Doing some research on safety features and ratings can help you make a good, informed choice about which vehicle your teen will drive. You want to have them in a car that will protect them if anything happens. Though the sports car that they really want is super cool, a small SUV or sturdy sedan is probably a safer option.

8. Don’t let your teen drive tired.

Drowsy driving can be just as dangerous as drunk driving in terms of worsened reaction time. High schoolers often have to stay up late to cram for tests or finish homework. If your teen stays up late and is running low on sleep, offer to drive them to school or encourage them to take the bus. Phrase it as being an extra chance to get some rest and relax.

9. Show them that the time for seatbelts is all the time.

Your teen driver needs to understand that seatbelts are not optional. Every passenger and the driver needs to be buckled up. It’s the driver’s job to do a seatbelt check and make sure that everyone is good to go before departing. This is for everyone’s safety: seatbelts prevent people from being thrown from vehicles if there is a crash. Seatbelts save lives.

10. Emphasize communication.

Have your teen driver get in the habit of telling you where they’re going, how long they’ll be, and when they’re on their way home. You’ll feel better about your kid charging off on their own if you have a system for checking that they arrived safely. (But of course emphasize no texting while driving, even if they’re texting you.)

Having a teen who’s ready to get their license and start driving is nerve-wracking for parents. But by encouraging good driving habits and giving your kid the opportunity to get lots of practice, you can help them stay safe behind the wheel.

Having a teen driver can be stressful, but you can help keep them safe.

We can also help you save money on teen auto insurance. All you have to do to get quotes for auto insurance is fill out our quote form or give us a call today. We would be happy to help you find quality insurance at a great rate.

Source:

https://www.safekids.org/blog/you-can-keep-your-teen-drivers-safer-here-are-7-ways-can-help

https://www.safekids.org/blog/teen-driver-safety

How to get cheap teen car insurance in Atlanta

Car insurance for teens can get expensive.

If you’re the parent of a teen who’s about to get their license, you’ve probably got some mixed emotions. One thing on your mind (other than worrying about your teen’s safety) is probably how much car insurance for your teenager will cost. Odds are you’ve heard the rumors that teen car insurance is expensive.

Read moreHow to get cheap teen car insurance in Atlanta