Atlanta safety guide for the Fourth of July

Stay safe this Fourth of July.

Stay safe this Fourth of July. The Fourth of July can be a fun day for the whole family. However, backyard barbecues and booming fireworks can bring a lot of danger to you or your guests. Many of these holiday mishaps are preventable if you prepare for the holiday correctly. But where can you start? Check out these tips to keep your Atlanta Independence Day fun, safe, and care-free.

Fourth of July fireworks safety

1. Find a safe place to ignite your fireworks

Fireworks are flammable, after all. So, before you break out your sparkling stash of fancy, sparkly lights, find a non-flammable surface to light your fireworks. Set off your fireworks on a concrete or metal surface, and make sure its path is clear of trees and power lines. Don’t shoot off the fireworks inside or near awnings, and make sure they have room to shoot straight up into the air – not at an angle where it could land and catch fire to your roof or someone else’s.

2. Keep your audience at a distance.

It may be tempting for your little ones or pets to come close to the bright, pretty lights on the Fourth of July. But fireworks, again, are extremely flammable (hence the term FIREworks). So, make sure that a responsible party is lighting the fireworks in a clear space and at a safe distance. If you’re lighting a firework, be sure to back away quickly when it ignites, and don’t light more than one firework at a time.

3. Wear protective clothing

If you’re in charge of the firework show this Fourth of July, it can be extremely helpful to wear protective clothing. That doesn’t mean you have to don an entire haz-mat suit. Just make sure that your eyes are protected, and any exposed skin is covered. It may be hot outside, but the sparks from a firework are hotter. So, wear something breathable, but covering. Don’t look directly into a lit firework and stay completely focused on lighting what’s in front of you.

4. Always supervise children with fireworks

Very young children should never play with fireworks. However, when your kid is a little older, who doesn’t like waving around a sparkler or two? Just make sure that they’re closely supervised while they’re lighting up your backyard or cul-de-sac. Although the sparks from these sticks may seem harmless, sparklers can burn at temperatures around 2,000⁰ F. So, set some ground rules and make sure everyone is on their best behavior.

5. Do NOT try to pick up “duds”

You may have lit a firework that sputtered and fizzled out. However, fireworks are unpredictable, and many injuries happen because of improper handling. So, if one of your fireworks is a “dud,” drop it on the ground, douse it in water, and then wait a few minutes to dispose of it properly. Do NOT throw the dud directly in the trash, and do NOT try to stomp it out. (This goes for sparklers as well.)

6. Keep a bucket of water nearby

If you’re lighting fireworks, it can be especially important to have water nearby. Have a big container of water that’s easily accessible to drop dead sparklers or dud fireworks into if needed.

7. Follow your local firework laws

Make sure to obey your local firework laws and noise ordinances for the Fourth of July. Some laws may vary by county or by city. Some laws may be in effect for a certain time period. Just make sure you know what they are for your specific area before taking on an entire arsenal of firework fun.

8. Have the right home insurance

It’s always a good idea to know which damages might be covered by your home insurance before the worst happens. But Fourth of July celebrations can pose a lot of fire risk to your home, even if you’re not the one lighting the way. So, check your home insurance policy for the different types of perils it may be able to cover. Make sure you have the right coverage and enough coverage to properly insure your home’s structure and/or your belongings should a rogue spark unluckily land on your roof or lawn.

Grilling for the Fourth of July

1. Know your grill

Make sure you know if you have a gas or charcoal grill and familiarize yourself with how to use it properly. If you have a gas grill, check your propane tank and hoses to make sure there are no leaks. NEVER use lighter fluid on a gas grill. Those are only for use on charcoal or wood.

If you have a charcoal grill, make sure the rest of your fuel and your lighter fluid are a safe distance away from the grill. You don’t want something to ignite before you’ve planned for it to do so.

2. Keep the grill a safe distance from other structures and trees

Regardless of the type of grill you have, make sure you’re using the grill outside and away from your house, shed, garage, or beloved backyard tree. If your grill is located under an awning, make sure that the roof is a proper distance above the heat. Keep an eye on the grill while it’s on to make sure its flames don’t rise too high.

Fourth of July safety tips

3. Prepare the proper tools

Before you start grilling, place all the tools you need around you before turning on the heat. This includes:

  • Meat tongs
  • Spatulas
  • Aprons
  • Grill gloves/mittens
  • Skewers
  • Serving utensils
  • Serving plates
  • Thermometers
  • Aluminum foil
  • Specialty grilling tools (brushes, basters, injectors, etc.)

NEVER leave a grill unattended. If you have forgotten something after the food is already on the flame, ask one of your guests to grab what you need and place it in a safe space near you (that’s not on the grill itself.) If all else fails, make sure that you keep a fire extinguisher or a hefty bucket of water nearby.

4. Keep away kids and pets

We know: The smell of summer barbecue is enticing to human and beast alike. But a grill is essentially an open grate full of fire. So, as a grill master, it’s your job to make sure no one gets burned. Keep children away and occupied from the grill. If you can help it, keep animals locked away or inside while the grill is on or open. A burger tastes better when enjoyed from a safe distance.

5. Handle food safely

Overall, you want to make sure that no one gets sick from your cooking (in any situation, really). So, take special care when creating your delicious outdoor meal, especially if you’re cooking for guests.

  • Wash your hands before and between handling foods if you’re touching raw meat. At the very least, have moist towelettes or hand sanitizer to sanitize your hands if you can’t step away from the grill.
  • Don’t use the same utensils for raw meat and cooked food.
  • Cook the food thoroughly. Beef should reach an internal temperature of at least 160⁰F and chicken should reach at least 165⁰. Now is not the time to test your cooking skills with rare and medium-rare meat.
  • If you’re marinating food, keep it in the fridge until it’s ready to cook.
  • Do NOT thaw food in the microwave.
  • Don’t let your leftovers sit out for more than two hours.

Travel

1. Prepare your car for a long trip

If you’re headed out on the road for your Fourth of July fun, make sure that your car is ready to handle the long drive. Check your tire pressure and your gas tank before you leave. Make sure you’ve had an oil change and tire rotation before you hit the road, as well as any other maintenance issues. You don’t want your trip to be stopped short on the side of the road because of a simple fix.

2. Be careful on social media

Here’s a secret: Thieves love holidays. They know that many people leave their houses unoccupied, which gives them a perfect opportunity to break into your home without anyone noticing. If you’re posting live social media updates and selfies of yourself while you’re not in your own backyard, you’ve notified any potential thieves that no one is watching your home. So, save the pictures of your summer getaway for when you get back.

3. Make your house look occupied

One of the biggest deterrents for burglars is a place that looks occupied. So, if you’re gone for a long period of time, have your mail held or forwarded. Ask a friend or neighbor to house-sit or at least keep an eye on the place while you’re away. Maybe they could mow your lawn for you so the grass doesn’t look too scruffy. Don’t give dead giveaway signs that you’re not around.

4. Keep your home secure

Before you leave, make sure all of your doors and windows are securely locked. Keep your security system armed and have a reliable contact method if your security company needs to contact you.

If you don’t have a security system, it might be worth it to look into getting one for your home. Many modern systems have remote access to lock and unlock your doors, motion activated lights, or surveillance cameras. These features can not only keep burglars at bay, but they may even help you save money on your homeowners’ insurance.

A Fourth of July weekend can be a special occasion to celebrate friends, family, and the nation. That’s why it’s important to take special care and precautions to keep the day as safe as possible. It’s also important to have the right home insurance to handle the many types of mayhem that can happen throughout the year.

Our insurance experts can help you get multiple quotes on the affordable home insurance you need, no matter the occasion. To stop missing out on great home insurance rates, just give us a call, fill out our online form, or LiveChat with a specialist today.

11 motorcycle safety tips

Motorcycle safety is extremely important.

Motorcycle safety is extremely important.

Buying a motorcycle can be the end goal to a lifelong dream, or maybe you just want a zippier way to get around town. Whatever your reason, a motorbike can be a rewarding mode of transportation. However, riding can be quite dangerous. So, it’s more important than ever to know how to stay safe while riding your motorcycle. Here, we’ll take on some of the most vital safety tips for your motorcycle trips.

11 motorcycle safety tips.

1. Take the right courses

Just as there are drivers ed courses, motorcycle education courses can teach you the ins and outs of your motorbike, plus how to operate it safely. Like most drivers’ ed classes, these courses will have written and on-the-road tests to gauge your skill level and qualify you for the proper license. To get the most out of your course, make sure you find a school that is supported by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation and/or has a Rider Education & Training System (RETS) curriculum.

2. Get the right license

While it may not be mandatory to obtain a motorcycle-specific license, the safest practice for operating a motorbike will be to take the proper courses and obtain a motorcycle-specific license. Typically, these licenses are classified as M1 or M2 licenses and should be obtained in addition to your Class C drivers’ license. Some states have different requirements in order to get your motorcycle licenses. However, they may also give you the option to skip the written and road tests for the license if you take the proper courses. So, check your state laws for motorcycle licensing. (Georgia, by the way, has a Class M motorcycle license.)

3. Always wear motorcycle safety gear

This may or may not go beyond just a helmet. Make sure that when you ride, you’re wearing gloves, pads, and proper clothing. Safety gear like helmets should always be checked for cracks, rips, and imperfections that could compromise the effectiveness of its protection in a crash. Make sure that your safety gear fits snugly, but not so tight that it impairs your movement on the bike.

Long-sleeved shirts and long, think pants can be helpful in an accident, but also while riding your bike. Pants made with thick/durable materials (like a sturdy set of jeans) can reduce the risk of skin burns from parts of the bike that get too hot. Long-sleeved tops or jackets can create a barrier in an accident and prevent more severe cases of road rash.

4. Don’t drive under the influence

Driving a motorbike requires you to be even more alert and aware of other drivers. Motorbikes are obviously a lot smaller and offer a lot less protection than the cabin of a four-wheeled vehicle that’s surrounded by metal. So, make sure you’re not altering your senses by operating your motorbike while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

5. Practice, practice, practice

Again, this goes beyond when the bike is actually in motion. Know where the various gears and controls of your bike are. Practice using and switching between them while your bike is turned off and safely parked.

You can consider taking a motorcycle safety course.

6. Follow the speed limit

It might be tempting to give the throttle all you’ve got, but speed limit signs are there for a reason. They were designed to be the best speed for that specific road in ideal conditions. So, keep an eye on your speedometer and be even more cautious when conditions on the road are less than ideal. This is an essential motorcycle safety thing.

7. Look out for hazards

Again, motorcycles are a lot smaller and offer a lot less protection than the cabin of a car. This means that small inconveniences to a car can cause much bigger problems for a motorbike. So, keep a close lookout for road hazards like debris, animals, potholes, cracks, bumps, and uneven spaces in the road. Pay attention to warning signs and learn the proper defensive riding techniques to safely avoid these hazards if you find yourself face to face with one.

8. Be hyper-aware of other drivers.

Remember, drivers of four-wheeled autos don’t have the full field of vision that you would on a motorbike. Try to stay out of vehicles’ blind spots (especially larger vehicles), avoid riding too close to vehicles, and pay special attention to how the drivers around you maneuver. Give yourself plenty of stopping distance between cars and plenty of room to account for erratic driving behavior.

9. Make your intent clear

Although a motorbike is small, avoid weaving between traffic and squeezing through tight spaces on the road. Most states inform drivers to give motorcycles the same space that they would give another car. So, do your best to define your motorbike’s “bubble” and drive according to the space you need.

Use your turn signals while turning and merging, and make sure you give the drivers around you enough notice of your intent to move.

10. Be especially careful when carrying passengers

Finally, if you’re taking someone else along for the ride, take special care to follow all traffic laws and safety measures. Make sure they know the rules of your bike and proper motorcycle safety as a passenger. You’re responsible for their life too if they’re tagging along!

11. Get the right motorcycle insurance

Unfortunately, accidents do happen, and with a motorcycle, those accidents can have more severe effects on everyone involved. So, you want to make sure that you have the proper coverage to protect yourself from anything that comes your way, on or off the road.

Our insurance experts know exactly what types of coverage you’ll need for your motorbike and your unique riding situation. We also know the best ways to save you money on only the coverage you need. So, stop missing out on great savings on quality motorcycle coverage. To start getting cheaper rates on the motorcycle insurance you need, give our insurance specialists a call, fill out our online form, or LiveChat with an agent today!

7 tips for driving at night and your winter commute in Atlanta

Take care when you're night driving or when you're on the way home from work.

Take care when you're night driving or when you're on the way home from work.

You may have noticed that you’re driving a bit more in the dark for your morning and afternoon commutes. Fall Daylight Savings Time can bring a little extra time to sleep in, but it can also help the night (and the sun) sneak up on you during your morning and afternoon drives.  Here are 7 tips to keep in mind on your winter commute, whether you’re driving off into the sunset or into the night.

Tips for driving at night and commuting in winter.

1. Keep some sunglasses handy.

Your parents may have told you not to look into the sun. However, with 7 a.m. sunrises and sunsets at 5:30 p.m., that can prove rather difficult. Your sun visors can only cover so much windshield real estate. So, if your commute takes you east in the morning and to west in the afternoon, it’ll be a pretty good idea to keep some sunglasses in your overhead or glove compartment.

Polarized sunglasses will be best since they cut down the amount of glare dispersed around your windshield. However, anything that can provide eye protection from the sun’s rays is going to be better than nothing.

2. When using your headlights – Monkey See, Monkey Do.

It’s a good rule of thumb when turning on your headlights to observe your surroundings. Do a lot of other drivers have their headlights on? If so, it’s probably a good idea to turn yours on too. Your eyes might have an easier time adjusting to darkening road conditions, but it’s important to remember that your lights are also to let other drivers see you. Plus, with newer cars having automatic headlights, the lights of other cars can be a great tell-tale signal that it’s the recommended time of day to have them on.

3. Don’t use your brights!

Your high beams may help you see a lot farther than your normal lights, but they’re blinding to a lot of the drivers around you. High-beam lights, or “brights,” are really only meant to be used when driving in rural areas and on open highways that are NOT in metro areas. In fact, the Department of Driver Services states that you should not use bright headlights when:

  • You’re within 500 ft. of another vehicle.
  • You’re driving on a lighted road.
  • You’re driving in rain, fog, snow, or smoke.
  • Your vision is reduced to less than 200 ft.

If you’re having trouble seeing the road ahead, it’s okay to wait in your car before pulling out of your parking space to let your eyes adjust. If you still have trouble seeing at night, there are certain types of glasses specifically made for night driving. You may be able to find them at your local sunglass store, on Amazon, or through your eye doctor.

4. Remember your signal lights.

When you’re in low visibility (or driving at night), it can be hard to see how another driver is maneuvering. So, make sure that your blinkers are working properly and that you use them to signal when you change lanes or when you’re making a turn. Give yourself enough time for the cars around you to make room for your car, then move your car once you have adequate space to make your lane change or turn. Also, if you see another driver with their signal on, make sure to give them enough time and room to turn or merge by gradually slowing down to a safe speed that allows them to maneuver their vehicle.

5. Follow the leader, but not too closely!

An object in motion tends to stay in motion. It’s not just a fun factoid from your high school science class, it’s also a little detail that can cause a car crash if you’re following another car too closely. When you’re traveling at high speeds, your car wants to keep moving forward, regardless of if you’re applying the brakes (which is why you may fall forward a bit when you stop at a stop light.)

Think about it – there’s a lot that goes into stopping a car, especially when you’re behind another driver. You have to allow time to register the other driver’s stop, move your foot from the gas to the brake, apply enough pressure to stop the car, and then wait for the car to actually stop. During the night or lower-lit conditions, your perception and visibility are lessened, which makes this process take even longer. Even if this interaction only takes a few seconds, not allowing enough space for all of this time to pass will usually slam you straight in the middle of an accident. (And remember, your driving record is one of the factors that affect your Atlanta insurance rates.)

So, what’s the easy fix? Give yourself a little space! You’ll have plenty of distance to maneuver safely in traffic, and the driver in front of you may actually go faster because they’re not blinded by your headlights in their rearview mirrors.

6. Keep Your Windows Squeaky Clean!

The same way that the tiny bulbs in your headlights and taillights can light up your way home is the same way that the lights of other vehicles can completely hinder your driving. Dirty, smudgy windows can help light disperse across your windshield, making it too bright to see the road ahead. Smudges can also warp the vision through your windshield, and dirt can create new blind spots altogether.

It may be tempting to skip the car wash since they’re less pollen and dust in the air, but giving your windshield a wipe-down in the winter can help a lot when you’re dealing with lower visibility (like when you’re night driving.)

7. Don’t fight the weather

With all of the snow forecasts turning into rain, it can be difficult to tell what the weather conditions will be on your drive home. However, whether you’re caught driving in the rain, sleet, ice, or snow, it’s important not to fight the weather (especially if night driving is involved.) If you don’t feel safe getting or staying on the road, trust your gut! It’s better to be a little late to your destination than to put yourself or others in danger if you have trouble seeing, maneuvering, or driving in stormy weather. Pull over to the side of the road, put your hazard lights on, and wait out the storm. (And don’t forget to get your car ready for winter before the weather gets really cold!)

Remember, it’s important to keep yourself safe behind the wheel of the car by being aware of other drivers. The thought of getting home and finally relaxing after a long day can put you in a bit of a hurry. However, if you’re driving at night, taking extra caution and being even more aware of your surroundings can be a great help in reducing accidents and getting home safely.

In a worst-case scenario, though, it’s important to have the right Atlanta car insurance for your day and night driving needs. And we can help you get great rates! Call our agents today to find out how you can save money on car insurance, or just fill out our online form to start getting affordable rates on car insurance in Atlanta.

Source:

http://www.eregulations.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/18GADM-LR.pdf

11 summer road trip tips for Memorial Day Weekend

If you're going on a road trip this summer, check out these tips.

If you're going on a road trip this summer, check out these tips.

School is almost out for the summer for the kids, Memorial Day is coming right up, and it’s time for vacation. You might be planning a road trip for the family this summer. Maybe you’re going sight-seeing, or maybe you’re going to visit extended family. Wherever your destination may be, it’s important to be safe on your trip. Check out the following tips to have the funnest (we may be making up words) and best road trip ever.

1. Get your car a checkup.

If you’re going to be going on a long trip, it’s important that your car is up to the task. You’re kind of asking it to run a marathon, so be sure to take it to a trustworthy mechanic for a quick tune-up. Check over things like your tire pressure, tire tread depth, oil, wiper blades, and wiper fluid.

Your car is a faithful friend. Give it some TLC before you ask it to traverse hundreds of miles. It’s the nice thing to do.

2. Plan your route.

It’s kind of nice to know where you’re going. Plan out your route and have a plan for GPS/navigation. It might be a good idea to go old-school and print out a set of directions so that you have something to go by in case your GPS or navigation conks out. Never hurts to be prepared! Your trip could take a very unexpected turn (literally) if your GPS dies.

3. Pack your car carefully.

Yes, your car might resemble a carefully planned puzzle, but you need to pack all of the suitcases and gear in such a way that the car is balanced. So, send your car to yoga class and help it find its inner balance.

Also, make sure that your view is not obstructed. Being able to see through the rear-view mirror is kind of important.

4. Have a flat-tire emergency plan.

Flat tires happen. It’s a tenet of Murphy’s Law – anything that can go wrong will go wrong. It’s important to have your spare tire ready to go in case you need it…and to know how to use it. Make sure you’ve got the proper tools to change a tire. And if no one who will be in the car knows how to get the job done, make sure to have the number of a roadside assistance service handy (or get a roadside assistance membership and be sure to bring the card with you.)

5. Bring snacks. Lots of snacks.

Sharing a car with cranky, grouchy, hungry passengers…stressful. Pack plenty of snacks. Try to bring a variety of foods – sweet, salty, and healthy – to keep everyone appeased. Especially the kids. Hungry children are not happy children.

And speaking of snacks – well, fuel…

Don’t forget to be mindful of your gas gauge. If you’ll have to go long stretches without passing a gas station over the course of your road trip, plan accordingly. Know how much mileage your car gets per gallon.

6. Pack a car emergency kit.

You can put together a car emergency kit prior to your trip. It should include car-related items you may need, like jumper cables, but other practical items, too. For starters…

  • Rain poncho
  • Flashlight
  • Reflective vest and reflective triangle
  • First-aid kit
  • Food and water

Of course, there are ready-made kits that you can buy online. You might want to do some research to find out if there’s a reasonably-priced one that will work for you.

7. Bring or plan entertainment for the kids.

Bored, squealing, shouting, or crying children can be a distraction to the driver. Yes, you love your kids, but it’s vital that you have plenty of things to do to occupy them so they’re quiet, calm, and happy throughout the trip. Figure out fun things for them to do. Whether that’s downloading movies on your tablet or playing car road trip games, plan accordingly and let the good times roll.

8. Stay tuned to the weather forecast.

Summer can bring some crazy weather, and things can get so intense that it might be downright unsafe to drive. Heavy rains and storms are common for the summer months, so keep tabs on the weather and adjust your route/plans accordingly. Hopefully, you won’t have any rain on your parade, but use your smartphone or listen to the radio to get important weather updates.

9. Be on the watch for distracted or drunk drivers.

Stay alert and watch the road carefully. Scan your surroundings and be prepared to take action if something happens. Distracted driving is really dangerous, as is drunk driving, so you have to be alert for other drivers who are not behaving safely.

A tip if you’re driving down a highway –

Stay in the middle or right lanes of traffic. If someone traveling the opposite direction crosses the solid yellow lines onto your side of the road, this will give you more time to react and prevent an accident.

10. Get lots of sleep.

Driving while drowsy is not a good idea. It’s downright dangerous. As you get more and more tired, you lose your ability to react fast to dangers, hold the car steady, and make quick decisions. Make sure you get plenty of sleep the night before the road trip.

But keep in mind that boredom from the road and certain medications can also cause drowsiness. If you need to, take a break. Stretch, walk around, and switch with someone who is not mentally fatigued from driving. (Remember, being a safe driver can help you save money on car insurance.)

Being overly tired can be like driving drunk. Your reaction times and decision-making are that impaired. Making sure everyone gets plenty of rest is generally a road-trip best practice. Tiredness usually goes hand-in-hand with grouchiness…and that’s no fun for anyone.

11. Make sure everyone buckles up.

Seatbelts are a must. Seatbelts save lives by stopping people from flying forward in the event of a crash. If a car is traveling 65 miles per hour, that means everything in the car is also traveling at 65 mph. Which means that if the car stops, all passengers will continue forward at 65 mph until something stops them. And it’s better if that something is a seatbelt than a windshield or the back of a seat. The seatbelt will distribute the force of the crash over a wide, strong area of the body.

Anyways. Remember that seatbelts are for the cool kids. Buckle up, everyone.

So, there are our top road trip tips for the summer. And of course, we wish you safe travels to wherever your summer adventures take you.

Are you looking to save money on auto insurance? We can help you get multiple quotes for your Atlanta car insurance. By shopping your rates, you can compare pricing and coverage options. To get in touch, fill out our quote form or give us a call today.

Source:

https://www.safewise.com/blog/road-trip-safety-tips/ 

How to get cheap teen car insurance in Atlanta

Car insurance for teens can get expensive.

If you’re the parent of a teen who’s about to get their license, you’ve probably got some mixed emotions. One thing on your mind (other than worrying about your teen’s safety) is probably how much car insurance for your teenager will cost. Odds are you’ve heard the rumors that teen car insurance is expensive.

Well, unfortunately, the rumors hold some truth.

Auto insurance for teen drivers is expensive because they’re at a high risk of having an accident. Teens aren’t experienced drivers yet (which is why it’s important to make sure that they get lots of practice) and they tend to take a lot of risks. Anyways, the good news is that you can get cheap car insurance for your teenager, and we’ll explain how.

Check out the following tips.

Read moreHow to get cheap teen car insurance in Atlanta

5 reasons to drive safely (Hint: You could save on Atlanta car insurance)

Driving safe can help you save on your car insurance.

Driving in Atlanta is always a bit of an adventure. Narrow streets, roadwork, limited parking, and, of course, figuring out how to survive Atlanta traffic! Perhaps even more intimidating than driving in the city is car insurance. It’s important to learn about car insurance so that you can answer common car insurance questions, but you might dread thinking about auto insurance because the rates can be so expensive. But there’s a simple, easy way to save on your car insurance – driving safe. We’ll give you five car-insurance-related reasons to be a straight-A driver.

1. Your car insurance premium is directly related to your driving record.

When an insurance company goes to give you a quote on your car insurance, they look into your driving record. They’ll most likely check your record for accidents and tickets from the past three to five years. From your record, they’ll determine how much of a risk you and your family are to insure. The higher a risk you are, the more you’ll have to pay for insurance. Insurance companies consider accidents and tickets to be risky because statistically, drivers with tickets and accidents will have more tickets and accidents in the future.

2. If you have no tickets or accidents, you might be able to get lower quotes when you shop.

If you have good driving habits and have a clean record, your premium will reward you and you’ll end up paying less for your auto insurance. The quotes you’ll receive from auto insurance companies will be lower – you may even be pleasantly surprised!

3. After a few years of good driving, you may be able to get a discount on your rates.

If you go for a good amount of time with no tickets or accidents, you could qualify for a discount on your auto insurance rates (depending on your carrier, of course.) Insurance companies like to reward drivers who drive safely. The fewer claims you have, the better. You want to present as little risk as possible to the insurance company, and that means no accidents. And that means no distracted driving, speeding, drowsy driving, or other risky driving behavior. Sure, we can’t control the actions of other drivers on the road, but we can control our own actions. And that means making conscious choices to be a safer driver and avoiding distracted or unsafe driving.

4. By driving safe, you might be able to qualify for accident forgiveness.

Usually, having a car accident would make your rates go up – insurance companies don’t like risk, remember? If you’ve had a clean driving record for a good amount of time, your carrier might allow you to have accident forgiveness. That means that if you do happen to have a car accident, your rates would not go up. Ask if your carrier has accident forgiveness.

5. Depending on your insurance company, you may be able to lower your deductible.

The deductible is the amount that you agree to pay if you have a claim before the insurance company will step in to help you cover costs. Of course, this all depends on your insurance company. But if your company does allow you to lower your deductible for having a clean driving record, that means less money out of your pocket if you ever have a claim.

Being a safe driver and keeping your full attention on the road is important to help you avoid a car accident. This is your health and life that we’re talking about, along with the safety of other drivers on the road. Apart from preventing accidents and injuries to yourself and others, being a safe driver can help you save on your car insurance. So, as you can see, there are many reasons to be a careful driver and avoid risky driving when you get behind the wheel.

Looking for a car insurance quote in Atlanta? We would love to help you get the car insurance you need so you can hit the road with peace of mind. All you have to do to get in touch with one of our insurance agents is fill out our online quote form or give us a call today – we’d be happy to help you with all of your insurance needs!